Reading Response- Disrupting Thinking (Part 2)

In Part 2 of Disrupting Thinking: Why How We Read Matters, Beers and Probst discuss how teachers can develop responsive, responsible, and compassionate readers. The authors have created the BHH Framework to help cultivate the kind of readers we want. Below, I will briefly introduce the BHH Framework along with the accompanying questions:

  • (B)ook: What’s this about? / What did I notice?
  • (H)ead: What surprised me? / What confused me?
  • (H)eartWhat life lessons did I learn?

As this post is a “Reading Response,” I will be responding to selected questions that appear at the end of each chapter.

I’d also like to encourage you to read the book along with me and respond to the selected questions in the comment section. Continue reading “Reading Response- Disrupting Thinking (Part 2)”

It Takes a School to Change a (10) Child

A friend of mine shared with me a huge choice he made at the end of last school year.

He volunteered to teach a remedial grade 6 class with a long history of behavior problems.

Their behavior problems are so bad that many (and I mean many) of their former teachers have moved on to other schools, specifically citing behavior issues as the reason.

Sounds exciting, right?

More like “What was he thinking?”

In this post, I want to reflect on the experiences he shared with me and discuss my take on the solution. Continue reading “It Takes a School to Change a (10) Child”

Research Spotlight- Effective teacher talk: A threshold concept in TESOL

Teachers talk in the classroom every day.

Seems like such an obvious statement, so much so that it wouldn’t be worth writing about.

But an important question arises from this well-known fact: when teachers talk, is their talk always effective?

Barbara Skinner has concerns that the answer is ‘no’ and that teacher preparation programs should put more focus on what is known as “teacher talk” and how to make it more effective. Continue reading “Research Spotlight- Effective teacher talk: A threshold concept in TESOL”

Reading Response- Disrupting Thinking (Part 1)

Student apathy.

This problem, identified as the biggest problem teachers face in the classroom, is the motivation behind the book Disrupting Thinking: Why How We Read Matters.

The Goal: Get students excited about learning by helping students connect to their reading in a personal way, not for the sake of a multiple choice test.

In part 1, Beers and Probst define the readers they believe teachers want to develop. The readers are:

  1. Tomorrow’s Leaders
  2. The Responsive Reader
  3. The Responsible Reader
  4. The Compassionate Reader

As this post is a “Reading Response,” I will be responding to selected questions that appear at the end of each chapter.

I’d also like to encourage you to read the book along with me and respond to the selected questions in the comment sections.

Continue reading “Reading Response- Disrupting Thinking (Part 1)”

Does Positive Reinforcement Work?

Jody Stallings, a middle school teacher and contributor to the Moultrie News, recently wrote an article titled “Teacher to Parent – Positive reinforcement doesn’t work in the long run” in which he responded to the following question from a third-grade parent:

My third grade son recently came home in tears saying he didn’t want to go to school anymore because he was punished for talking during silent reading. The teacher kept him in from recess. I think this is horrible. It isn’t a teacher’s job to destroy a child’s love for school. Instead of constant punishment for every little infraction, what about using positive reinforcement?

Continue reading “Does Positive Reinforcement Work?”

Presenting Vocabulary to EFL Students

Vocabulary size is a key predictor of language ability, so as language teachers it is important that we teach it right!

While there is no one way to “teach it right,” I would like to present to you how I present vocabulary to my EFL students. This is the first day of usually a 4-5 day vocabulary teaching sequence. Continue reading “Presenting Vocabulary to EFL Students”

Lingro- The Coolest Dictionary Known to Hombre

Have you ever noticed how much time it takes to look up a word from a website you are reading?

Depending on your method, you need to open up a new page, copy or type the word into the dictionary, and then go back to the original site to reexamine the context.

Super timesink!

Now imagine that same scenario when reading in a second language?

Most of us might give up depending on how many words we don’t know.

But what if there were a faster way…

That’s where Lingro.com comes in. Continue reading “Lingro- The Coolest Dictionary Known to Hombre”